President Bannon

Despite the serious nature of some (most?) of the actions taken by our new president in his first week in office, I’ve been pleased to see that everyone hasn’t lost their sense of humor, and of the absurd.  I particularly liked this photo, reportedly from an anti-Trump protest in Cardiff, Wales, because of the sign on the far right:

C3b8Qm2W8AAO-Or.jpg large

What would move a group of Welsh women to make signs to protest an action of the American president?  Well, now we know the answer to that one.

Another I very much enjoyed was this short, simple statement to remind us all just who, perhaps, is really behind what’s coming out of the White House (be sure to check out some of the comments on this one):

And remembering what we’ve learned about the maturity and patience of our narcissistic chief executive, I had an idea:

So whaddya say–how about let’s see if enough social media references to “President Bannon” will have an impact.  If you agree that this social science experiment is worth a little effort, try to work the phrase in as much as possible when you post and let’s see if it catches on.  This one here should be considered an instant classic of the genre:

C3bJuKtW8AE6I1U

Another Astro hits the Hall!

Congratulations, Jeff Bagwell: the Houston Astros’ all-time leader in homers and RBIs and chin hair was voted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame today, leading the field with more than 86% of the vote on his seventh time around! t1_bagwell

4935d991bb8a427e84913568ae75cbc6-2d88d9b3ecd94f6b9ee0d3c4ab0edcc0-0

I say he deserves it: some of his power numbers don’t reach the level of obvious Hall of Famer, but they’re damn close…but he was also an all-around player, a great fielder and baserunner, and a respected team leader.  This Astros fan will be proud to watch him join the best of the best in Cooperstown this summer.

"I have a dream"

This was my post in August 2013 on the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, including a YouTube clip of the entire speech; I repost it to honor the holiday is his memory and to remind us of his call to a virtuous future…I think some of us could use the reminder about now.

Fifty years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., took the podium at the Lincoln Memorial and delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom; it is still one of the most profound and moving speeches in the history of American rhetoric, on top of what it meant to the civil rights movement.  King did not dream that his children would one day be able to watch the speech on their desktop computer or smartphone, but they can, and so can we.

The whole thing is remarkable, including the peek you get at what a slice of America looked like in the early 1960s; go to the 12:00 mark to catch the dreams, and then on through to the end for the ad-libbed “let freedom ring”s and the promise of ultimate freedom which still stir my emotions.

“…let freedom ring.  And when this happens…and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: free at last, free at last, thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

Out of the coverage leading up to this week’s anniversary I’ve pulled a couple of gems: from Brian Naylor at NPR, a look at the little segregated southern town that was Washington, D.C. 50 years ago; and from Robert G. Kaiser in The Washington Post, a reporter’s remembrance of the event he covered 50 years earlier, with a quite remarkable admission—that the local paper blew it when it all but overlooked King’s speech in its coverage of the march!